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How to do Deadlifts and its Variation?

Health and fitness

The deadlift is a complex and joint exercise of the lower body. Because lifting can done with heavy loads, a great mechanical stimulus enters the body and helps to adapt strength and power. Deadlift is the best exercise to strengthen the muscles of the back chain (e.g., back, buttocks, hamstrings) to adjust you (i.e. starting position). Because the barbell remains in front of the center of gravity, the spinal recto muscles are in greater demand for spinal stability than other free-weight combined exercises (such as back squats). The deadlift is one of the three events seen in the sport of powerlifting and is included as a complementary movement in the weightlifting program. With proper training and supervision, the exercises will be relatively easy. However, its simplicity does not jeopardize the effectiveness of the exercise, and it is an ideal exercise for inclusion in power and ventilation programs and personal training sessions for lifters of any level of experience. A deadlift is a valuable tool that in addition to use in competitive and recreational sports, is used in postoperative and non-surgical rehabilitation protocols. This exercise has shown to be beneficial in reducing the risk of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and lowering back pain.

The deadlift is a complex and joint exercise of the lower body. Because lifting can be done with heavy loads, a great mechanical stimulus enters the body and helps to adapt strength and power. The deadlift is the best exercise to strengthen the muscles of the back chain (e.g., back, buttocks, and back thighs) to adjust you (i.e. starting position).

 

Procedure of Deadlift

Proper biomechanics at the starting position is essential for safe and efficient lifting against mortality. All fluctuations in the deadlock should do slowly and in a controlled manner. To increase safety and effective learning, lifters unfamiliar with deadlifts use light or unloaded bars to learn the correct position and develop appropriate athletic skills. Deadlifts and their changes taught under close supervision and not directly encountered as squats or bench press exercises. Proper technology and control must be demonstrated before gaining weight to lift. Instructors and trainers should provide clues to quick and easy techniques to perform during the next workout.

Proper biomechanics at the starting position is essential for safe and efficient lifting against mortality. All fluctuations in the deadlock should do slowly and in a controlled manner. To increase safety and effective learning, lifters unfamiliar with deadlifts use light or unloaded bars to learn the correct position and develop appropriate athletic skills.

 

Conventional Deadlift

 

  • Setup
  • The bar should be on the ground, approximately 1-2 inches from the vertical base, just above the distal end of the metatarsus (i.e., the metatarsus).
  • Keep your legs straight between your hips and shoulders. The toes should be forward or slightly out.
  • Bend your knees slightly, lean toward the bar, and rotate your hips straight back by moving the “hinge”. The knees should be straight and the pores should be upright as you lean toward the bar.
  • On the outside of the knees, release your hand a little wider than your shoulders and lift the bar with a double grip. Keep your elbows fully extended.
  • From here, move your knees forward until your thighs hit the bar and lower your hips to your final starting position. Align your head and neck with your torso by turning your eyes slightly down. The back should be straight to keep the spine neutral.
  • To prevent sagging, lift your chest and apply a little pressure to your upper back.

 

 

  • Action

Concentric / rising phase

  • Keep your head neutral, your torso firm, your arms fully extended, and your hips and knees raised to lift the bar off the ground.
  • Keep your hips off, press your feet to the ground, and move the bar up.
  • When the bar reaches your knee, stretch your hips forward and move your thighs forward to fit the bar. Keep your hips and knees straight to a standing position.

 

Eccentric / low phase

  • From a standing position, bend at the hips and knees to bring the bar down to the ground. Keep your head neutral and you are back straight until the bar returns to the ground.

 

 

  • Tips
  • Do not get too close to the bar when entering the starting position. The shoulders should be directly in line with the bar or slightly forward.
  • Do not stretch your knees too soon. Straighten your knees slowly and in a controlled manner so that your hips lift at the same speed as your chest.
  • Do not push the bar or lean your back too far on the lift.

 

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